Oldal kiválasztása

cat039 (Perino 2194)


Attributed to Perino del Vaga
(1501–1547)

The Triumph of David

c. 1516–19
Pen and wash in brown ink
262 × 397 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 2194

 

 

 

Pope Leo X entrusted the decoration of the second-floor loggia of the Vatican palace to Raphael. The painter limited his participation to the preparation of designs and supervision of work, while the execution of the frescoes of Biblical themes and the all’antica stuccoes was delegated to his workshop. The severely abraded Budapest sheet, squared for transfer, was probably drawn by Perino del Vaga, who was perhaps also responsible for the painting of the corresponding vault fresco. The composition derives from a relief of the triumphal arch of Titus.

cat034 (Perino 1838)


Perino del Vaga
(1501–1547)

Study for a Wall Decoration

c. 1537
Pen and wash in brown and grey ink, over black chalk
420 × 290 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 1838

 

 

 

When Perino returned to Rome, one of his first commissions was the decoration of the Massimi Chapel in SS. Trinità dei Monti. The fresco cycle representing Christ’s miracles, already destroyed, was executed in 1538–1539. The meticulously drawn Budapest sheet, made in preparation of the south wall of the chapel, was most probably intended for the patron, Angelo Massimi. The central panel depicting the healing Christ is surrounded by four smaller all’antica scenes and grotesque stucco decorations.

cat033 (Perino 1930)


Perino del Vaga
(1501–1547)

Sketches for the Decoration of a Ceiling

c. 1528–30
Pen and brown ink
203 × 150 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 1930

 

 

 

During his decade-long stay in Genoa, Perino decorated the renovated Palazzo Doria with frescoes and stuccoes. The works celebrated Andrea Doria as defender of the Genoese Republic with references to mythology and Roman history. The sheet contains rapid sketches for the painted spandrels of the ceiling of the atrium. The figures, bound by lines indicating the architecture, can be identified as Neptune and Hebe at the top, Hercules and Vesta at the bottom. The smaller groups in between are early ideas for the historical scenes of the lunettes.

cat032 (Perino 1868)


Perino del Vaga
(1501–1547)

Battle of Centaurs and Lapiths

c. 1545–47
Black chalk
197 × 284 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 1868

 

 

 

The Cassetta Farnese, a silver-gilt casket made for Cardinal Alessandro Farnese, was decorated with six oval rock crystals, engraved with mythological subjects (Museo Nazionale di Capodimonte, Naples). Two of the compositions are based upon antique prototypes, whereas the other four were designed by Perino del Vaga in the first half of the 1540s. Related to the corresponding scene, the Budapest drawing lacks the characteristics of finished studies. It may have been made after the crystal for another purpose, most probably a bronze plaquette.

cat031 (Perino 1794)


Perino del Vaga
(1501–1547)

Study for Saint George and the Dragon (recto)

 

 

 

 

 

 


Figure Studies (verso)

c. 1535
Pen and brown ink, over red chalk
215 × 258 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 1794

 

 

 

 

 

The study was realized in the acquaintance of Raphael’s Saint George, painted around 1504–5 in Florence (Washington, National Gallery of Art). However, its direct source was rather Fra Bartolommeo’s painting of the same subject, already lost, that Perino could have seen in the palace of Francesco del Pugliese during his Florentine stay in 1522–23. The Budapest drawing, made in Perino’s mature style, was executed only a decade later, from the painter’s memory or after his earlier sketches.
After the Sack of Rome in 1527, Perino del Vaga moved to Genoa, where until his return to Rome in 1538, he was primarily occupied with the decoration of the palace of his patron, Andrea Doria. The sketches on the verso also relate to the Palazzo Doria: the nude studies may be associated with the frescoes of the Stanza di Psiche, while the seated nude was made for one of the virtues in the Stanza delle Metamorfosi.

cat030 (Caraglio 6748)


Jacopo Caraglio
(c. 1500/5–1565)
After Perino del Vaga
(1501–1547)

Jupiter and Mnemosyne

1527
Engraving, 211 × 135 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 6748
Read More

 

Jupiter’s loves supplied the subject of five engravings of the series. Jupiter charmed Mnemosyne, goddess of memory in the guise of a shepherd, and from their nine amorous nights the muses were born. In the profane scene only the inclusion of Amor, and Jupiter’s eagle suggests that we are witnessing the love of deities. The inscription, engraved on a separate plate, belongs to another print of the series, the Apollo and Huacinthos, and was interchanged during the printing of later impressions.

cat029 (Caraglio 6758)


Jacopo Caraglio
(c. 1500/5–1565)
After Perino del Vaga
(1501–1547)

Vertumnus and Pomona

1527
Engraving, 210 × 136 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 6758
Read More

 

Among the many successors of the series I modi, the earliest was the Loves of the Gods, for which Rosso Fiorentino was first entrusted to supply drawings. Only two were completed when he fell out with the publisher Baviera, who then commissioned Perino del Vaga with the continuation of the work. The print represents the fulfilment of the love of Vertumnus, god of seasons, towards Pomona, goddess of fruitful abundance.

cat020 (Perino 1864)


Perino del Vaga
(1501−1547)

Studies for Friezes and a Crouching Female Nude (recto)

 

 

 

 

 


Studies of Figures and a Frieze (verso)

c. 1537−39
Pen and brown ink, some traces of red chalk
275 × 395 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 1864

 

 

 

 

 

On the sheet containing studies on both sides, Perino recorded frieze and figure studies developed from various artworks. The arrangement of the motifs indicates that the painter used the sheet first for the friezes, and filled the remaining spaces with figure studies. The source for the friezes imitating antique reliefs and depicting putti, satyrs and nymphs was probably a painted Roman façade by Polidoro da Caravaggio.

cat019 (Perino 1917-191)


Perino del Vaga
(1501−1547)

Studies for Grotesques

c. 1545
Pen and brown ink
277 × 185 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 1917-191

 

 

 

The painter of Florentine origin, Perino del Vaga joined Raphael’s Roman workshop around 1517. Raphael and his assistants recreated antique grotesques on the evidence of remains in the recently discovered chambers of Nero’s palace, the Domus Aurea, decorated with diverting ensembles of interlaced garlands, bizarre animals, still-life and geometrical motifs. This sheet of studies relates to Perino’s last major undertaking, the decorations of the papal suite at Castel Sant’Angelo in Rome, executed from 1545. The inscriptions at left are instructions for the colouring.