Oldal kiválasztása

cat058 (Caraglio 46019)


Jacopo Caraglio
(c. 1500/5–1565)
Parmigianino
(1503–1540)

The Martyrdom of Two Saints

c. 1527
Engraving, 258 × 451 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 46019
Read More

 

Jacopo Caraglio was the only engraver with whom Parmigianino cooperated in Rome. The Martyrdom of Saints Peter and Paul is one of the four prints that we owe to their collaboration, whose success encouraged Parmigianino to produce its woodcut version later in Bologna with Antonio da Trento. The composition combining two scenes was inspired by Marcantonio Raimondi’s Martyrdom of Saint Cecilia, from which Parmigianino not only borrowed many details but the two engravings are also of almost identical size.

cat030 (Caraglio 6748)


Jacopo Caraglio
(c. 1500/5–1565)
After Perino del Vaga
(1501–1547)

Jupiter and Mnemosyne

1527
Engraving, 211 × 135 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 6748
Read More

 

Jupiter’s loves supplied the subject of five engravings of the series. Jupiter charmed Mnemosyne, goddess of memory in the guise of a shepherd, and from their nine amorous nights the muses were born. In the profane scene only the inclusion of Amor, and Jupiter’s eagle suggests that we are witnessing the love of deities. The inscription, engraved on a separate plate, belongs to another print of the series, the Apollo and Huacinthos, and was interchanged during the printing of later impressions.

cat029 (Caraglio 6758)


Jacopo Caraglio
(c. 1500/5–1565)
After Perino del Vaga
(1501–1547)

Vertumnus and Pomona

1527
Engraving, 210 × 136 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 6758
Read More

 

Among the many successors of the series I modi, the earliest was the Loves of the Gods, for which Rosso Fiorentino was first entrusted to supply drawings. Only two were completed when he fell out with the publisher Baviera, who then commissioned Perino del Vaga with the continuation of the work. The print represents the fulfilment of the love of Vertumnus, god of seasons, towards Pomona, goddess of fruitful abundance.