Oldal kiválasztása

cat051 (Fantuzzi 5901)


Antonio Fantuzzi
(fl 1537−50)
Probably After Raphael
(1483−1520)

The Miraculous Draught of Fishes

1540s
Etching, 261 × 328 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 5901
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During their only several years’ activity, etchers at the Fontainebleau court of Francis I created the first significant group of French Renaissance prints. The present etching may be connected with Antonio Fantuzzi on the basis of its specific manner. Relying on an early version of Raphael’s design, preserved in a drawing at the Albertina, Vienna, its composition is dominated by the foreground figures, while the main scene is placed in the background. The addition of the landscape and the remote townscape may have been the printmaker’s own invention.

cat050 (Schiavone 6308)


Andrea Schiavone
(c. 1510−1563)
After Raphael
(1483−1520)

The Miraculous Draught of Fishes

c. 1548−52
Etching, 191 × 271 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 6308
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The Venetian painter and etcher, Andrea Schiavone got acquainted with Raphael’s composition most probably through the chiaroscuro woodcut by Ugo da Carpi. Schiavone’s painterly etchings, characterised by their soft surface and rich gradations of tone, were created with an innovative application of the technique. As in many other instances, he had no intention to imitate his model faithfully: Schiavone not only remodelled the figures and the landscape, but by placing the background mountains to the other side, he altered the arrangement of the original composition.

cat048 (Franco 7043)


Giovanni Battista Franco
(?1510−1561)
After Raphael
(1483–1520)

Sts Peter and John Healing a Lame Man

mid-1540s
Etching and engraving, 272 × 406 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 7043
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Two decades after the publication of Parmigianino’s print, Raphael’s tapestry composition was also reproduced by Giovanni Battista Franco. Instead of the cartoon or Parmigianino’s print, the Venetian artist worked on the basis of Raphael’s early compositional study, today lost, in which the twisted right column was represented as a plain one.

cat047 (Parmigianino 6286)


Parmigianino
(1503−1540)
After Raphael
(1483–1520)

Sts Peter and John Healing a Lame Man

c. 1524−30
Etching and chiaroscuro woodcut, 268 × 401 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 6286
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Despite the technical novelties, this is Parmigianino’s most conservative composition, inspired by one of Raphael’s drawings for the tapestries intended for the Sistine Chapel. By the unusual combination of etching and woodcut, Parmigianino evoked the effects of washed pen drawings. The etching was executed by Parmigianino himself, but the cutting of the woodblocks required a skilled craftsman.

cat024 (Bonasone 6421)


Giulio Bonasone
(c. 1510−after 1576)

The Judgement of Paris

mid-1560s
Etching
298 × 458 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 6421

 

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The Bolognese printmaker often combined etching and engraving in the same print. His composition is a derivation from the engraving of the same subject by Marcantonio Raimondi and Raphael, and also directly from its Roman relief prototype. Bonasone followed the figures of the antique original very closely, but included them in a wider spatial arrangement.

cat007 (Parmigianino 6291)


Parmigianino
(1503−1540)

Sleeping Cupid

c. 1524−30
Etching and engraving
65 × 100 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 6291

 

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Parmigianino not only cooperated with the most eminent printmakers of the period, but was the first Italian painter making etchings himself. The Sleeping Cupid is a free interpretation of the slain child in the foreground of The Massacre of the Innocents by Marcantonio Raimondi and Raphael. It was one of Parmigianino’s first etchings in which he experimented with the possibilities of the technique.