Oldal kiválasztása

cat059 (Raimondi 5585)


Marcantonio Raimondi
(1470/82−1527/34)
After Raphael
(1483−1520)

Lucretia

c. 1511−12
Engraving, 205 × 129 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 5585
Read More

 

The engraving dating from Marcantonio Raimondi’s early Roman years follows a lost drawing by Raphael after an antique sculpture. Lucretia is thought to be the print to inspire the painter to provide Marcantonio with drawings to engrave. The figure of classical proportions and perfect contrapposto is completely removed from a narrative context. Marcantonio borrowed the landscape from a print by Lucas van Leyden.

cat058 (Caraglio 46019)


Jacopo Caraglio
(c. 1500/5–1565)
Parmigianino
(1503–1540)

The Martyrdom of Two Saints

c. 1527
Engraving, 258 × 451 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 46019
Read More

 

Jacopo Caraglio was the only engraver with whom Parmigianino cooperated in Rome. The Martyrdom of Saints Peter and Paul is one of the four prints that we owe to their collaboration, whose success encouraged Parmigianino to produce its woodcut version later in Bologna with Antonio da Trento. The composition combining two scenes was inspired by Marcantonio Raimondi’s Martyrdom of Saint Cecilia, from which Parmigianino not only borrowed many details but the two engravings are also of almost identical size.

cat057 (Raimondi 5517)


Marcantonio Raimondi
(1470/82−1527/34)
After Raphael
(1483−1520)

The Martyrdom of Saint Cecilia

c. 1520−25
Engraving, 238 × 405 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 5517
Read More

 

The engraving is related to the fresco, already destroyed, designed by Raphael and executed by his workshop in 1517–1519 in the chapel of Villa Magliana, a papal retreat outside of Rome. The scene combines the martyrdom of Saint Cecilia, boiled in a cauldron of oil, with the beheading of her husband and brother-in-law.

cat054 (Raimondi 5595)


Marcantonio Raimondi
(1470/82−1527/34)
Raphael
(1483−1520)

Quos Ego

c. 1515−16
Engraving, 430 × 330 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 5595
Read MOre

 

The ambitious print combining the features of Roman reliefs and illusionistic wall paintings embodies the perfect all’antica style. Its arrangement follows an antique relief type in which a central narrative panel is surrounded by several small subsidiary scenes. The print’s title quotes Virgil’s Aeneid, and its central scene represents the sea god Neptun calming the tempest raised by Aeolus against Aeneas’ fleet.

cat053 (Master of the Die 46052)


Master of the Die
(fl c. 1530–60)
After Raphael
(1483–1520)

Putti Playing

1532
Engraving, 187 × 285 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 46052
Read More

 

The Roman engraver of the generation after Marcantonio Raimondi, named after his typical signature as Master of the Die, reproduced the tapestries intended for the walls of the Sala di Costantino in a set of four prints. The print with putti playing in a wood did not belong to his original series, but is also related to a design for the tapestries.

cat048 (Franco 7043)


Giovanni Battista Franco
(?1510−1561)
After Raphael
(1483–1520)

Sts Peter and John Healing a Lame Man

mid-1540s
Etching and engraving, 272 × 406 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 7043
Read More

 

Two decades after the publication of Parmigianino’s print, Raphael’s tapestry composition was also reproduced by Giovanni Battista Franco. Instead of the cartoon or Parmigianino’s print, the Venetian artist worked on the basis of Raphael’s early compositional study, today lost, in which the twisted right column was represented as a plain one.

cat046 (Raimondi 25099)


Marcantonio Raimondi
(1470/82−1527/34)
Probably after Giulio Romano
(?1499–1546)

The Carcass (Lo Stregozzo)

c. 1520
Engraving and etching, 300 × 631 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 25099
Read More

 

Although sixteenth-century German prints of witchcraft are well known, the theme counts as a rarity in Italian art. This large engraving of a puzzling subject, possibly a witches’ sabbath, is intermixed with numerous antique motifs, especially those associated with bacchanals. The combination of elements related to sorcery and mythology suggests the scene is related with Hecate, the Underworld goddess of magic, and darkness. The print was executed after Raphael’s death, probably on the basis of Giulio Romano’s drawing.

cat045 (Raimondi 5786)


Marcantonio Raimondi
(1470/82−1527/34)
Raphael
(1483−1520)

The Plague (The Morbetto)

c. 1515−16
Engraving, 198 × 253 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 5786
Read More

 

Only four cases are known when Raphael drew with the specific intention that the design would be engraved by Marcantonio Raimondi. The Morbetto was the first occasion when instead of pen, he elaborated the composition in a tonal drawing for the engraver (Florence, Uffizi), who masterfully transferred the light and shade effects of the drawing onto the plate. Its title meaning ‘little plague’ refers to the small size of the print, whose theme derives from the Aeneid.

cat044 (Raimondi 5542)


Marcantonio Raimondi
(1470/82−1527/34)
Probably after Giorgione
(?1477/8−1510)

The Dream of Raphael

c. 1507−8
Engraving, 235 × 333 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 5542
Read More

 

Marcantonio Raimondi’s most famous Venetian engraving was the first print to represent a nocturnal scene. Inspired mainly by a lost painting of Giorgione, Marcantonio borrowed elements from several other artists. The sleeping women, arranged to show the female nude from two viewpoints, recall Giorgione’s figures, while the monstrous creatures derive from the strange inventions of Hieronymus Bosch, and the man descending from the wall of the burning town is a citation from Michelangelo’s Battle of Cascina.

cat043 (Raimondi 5570)


Marcantonio Raimondi
(1470/82−1527/34)

David

c. 1506
Engraving
170 × 107 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 5570

 

Read More

 

The technique of the engraving pre-dating Marcantonio Raimondi’s Roman years also reveals the deep impact of Albrecht Dürer. Although it was suggested that one of the compositions of the Bolognese painter, Francesco Francia was the source for the print, it was probably created upon the engraver’s own invention. David’s pose was inspired by the famous antique sculpture, the Apollo Belvedere.

cat042 (Raimondi 5683)


Marcantonio Raimondi
(1470/82−1527/34)
After Albrecht Dürer
(1471–1528)

The Visitation

c. 1506–8
Engraving, 292 × 211 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 5683
Read More

 

The international fame of the prints by Albrecht Dürer must have inspired Raphael to become involved in printmaking. As the most proficient printmaker of the period and a strikingly precise imitator of Dürer’s manner, Marcantonio Raimondi was the perfect choice of collaborator. Marcantonio arrived in Venice in 1506, where he gained a considerable profit from his copies after Dürer’s prints. He engraved more than seventy prints after the German artist, and copied seventeen of his twenty woodcuts of the series Life of the Virgin. As Marcantonio even used Dürer’s monogram, the indignant painter made a complaint by the Venetian authorities. This was the first copyright case in the history of printmaking.

cat030 (Caraglio 6748)


Jacopo Caraglio
(c. 1500/5–1565)
After Perino del Vaga
(1501–1547)

Jupiter and Mnemosyne

1527
Engraving, 211 × 135 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 6748
Read More

 

Jupiter’s loves supplied the subject of five engravings of the series. Jupiter charmed Mnemosyne, goddess of memory in the guise of a shepherd, and from their nine amorous nights the muses were born. In the profane scene only the inclusion of Amor, and Jupiter’s eagle suggests that we are witnessing the love of deities. The inscription, engraved on a separate plate, belongs to another print of the series, the Apollo and Huacinthos, and was interchanged during the printing of later impressions.

cat029 (Caraglio 6758)


Jacopo Caraglio
(c. 1500/5–1565)
After Perino del Vaga
(1501–1547)

Vertumnus and Pomona

1527
Engraving, 210 × 136 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 6758
Read More

 

Among the many successors of the series I modi, the earliest was the Loves of the Gods, for which Rosso Fiorentino was first entrusted to supply drawings. Only two were completed when he fell out with the publisher Baviera, who then commissioned Perino del Vaga with the continuation of the work. The print represents the fulfilment of the love of Vertumnus, god of seasons, towards Pomona, goddess of fruitful abundance.

cat028 (Raimondi 5616)


Marcantonio Raimondi
(1470/82−1527/34)
After Raphael
(1483−1520)

Pan and the Infant Bacchus

c. 1515−16
Engraving, 125 × 92 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 5616
Read More

 

It was probably Marcantonio Raimondi who devised the composition from several models. The awkward conjunction of the two figures, at the areas where they overlap, is characteristic of the engraver’s composite works. A telling example of moral purism of later centuries is that the detail regarded as scandalous was scraped out from the sheet.

cat027 (Raimondi 5532)


Marcantonio Raimondi
(1470/82−1527/34)

Bacchanal

early 1510s
Engraving
148 × 503 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 5532

 

Read More

 

The pornographic engraving representing an orgy of satyrs, bacchants and bacchantes is based on the relief of a Roman sarcophagus, whose motifs appear also in Giulio Romano’s compositions for I modi. Marcantonio Raimondi freely altered and added various details to his antique prototype.

cat025 (Scultori 5269)


Giovanni Battista Scultori
(1503−1575)

Mars and Venus

1539
Engraving
283 × 202 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 5269

 

Read More

 

Giovanni Battista Scultori started his career in the Mantuan workshop of Giulio Romano, executing stuccoes in the Palazzo del Tè. Later, as an engraver, he also primarily followed his master’s inventions. The Mars and Venus was also inspired by Giulio’s erotic compositions, most directly his painting of the same subject made for his patron, prince Federico II Gonzaga (Saint Petersburg, Hermitage).

cat023 (Raimondi 5516)


Marcantonio Raimondi
(1470/82−1527/34)
Raphael
(1483−1520)

The Judgement of Paris

c. 1518−20
Engraving, 292 × 435 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 5516
Read More

 

The composition was adapted from two ancient Roman sarcophagi that Raphael altered in the spirit of his mature classical style. Similarly to the working method he applied for his late commissions for paintings, Raphael may have delegated the creation of preparatory drawings for prints to his assistants. The preliminary drawing for The Judgement of Paris was probably made by workshop members, utilizing Raphael’s earlier Budapest Venus.

cat021 (Raimondi 2610)


Marcantonio Raimondi
(1470/82−1527/34)

Crouching Venus

c. 1509
Engraving
222 × 148 mm
Inv. no. 5610

 

Read More

 

The main figure of the engraving derives from the same celebrated antique sculpture whose versions appear also in the sheet of studies by Perino del Vaga. Raphael borrowed the posture of the Virgin in the Esterházy Madonna, with the mediation of Leonardo’s drawings, from the same antique marble. In contrast to the frontal view of the Esterházy Madonna, Marcantonio depicted the statue from a side-view and complemented it with a Dürer-like landscape. The curiosity of the Budapest impression is that it was printed in red.

cat018 (Dente 6833)


Marco Dente
(?−1527)

Ornamental Panel

early 1520s
Engraving
212 × 139 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 6833

 

Read More

 

Like for most of his fellow artists, Roman grotesque ornaments were accessible also for Marco Dente. However, the engraver was also inspired by the decorative motifs recreated in modern antique style by Raphael and his colleagues.

cat015 (Dente 6863)


Marco Dente
(?−1527)
Probably after Raphael
(1483−1520)

Laocoön

c. 1517−19
Engraving, 276 × 392 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 6863
Read More

 

While the figures of the two sons follow the famous antique sculpture, Laocoön, with his arms raised in prayer and knees bent upon the altar, as well as the narrative details derive from a late antique illustrated manuscript, the Vatican Virgil. The codex was accessible for Raphael and his fellow artists, and the composition of Marco Dente’s print was probably designed by the painter.

cat014 (Dente 6843)


Marco Dente
(?−1527)

Laocoön

c. 1520−25
Engraving
464 × 326 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 6843

 

Read More

 

The engraver from Ravenna, Marco Dente worked in Rome from the mid-1510s, where he made many prints after compositions by Raphael and his circle. This engraving represents the Laocoön group with almost archaeological precision, in front of a ruinous antique wall. At the time of the print’s execution, as indicated by the inscription of the pedestal, the marble was already placed in the Belvedere courtyard, thus the background suggesting the site of its rediscovery may be the printmaker’s invention. Dente depicted the sculpture in its almost original state, without later supplements. His print shows similarities to the Budapest drawing, but has no direct connection with it.

cat012 (Ghisi 25380)


Giorgio Ghisi
(1520−1582)
After Raphael
(1483−1520)

The School of Athens

1550
Engraving, 500 × 397 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 25380
Read More

 

Although the Mantuan engraver, Giorgio Ghisi transformed the fresco with an arched top into a rectangular format, he was certainly aware of the finished wall painting. This is proven by the inclusion of the seated figure in the foreground, usually identified as Michelangelo, that Raphael added subsequently to the fresco. The inscription describing the scene as Saint Paul preaching in Athens derives possibly from the publisher, and perhaps encouraged the selling of the print of a complex theological content.

cat011 (Raimondi 25102)


Marcantonio Raimondi
(1470/82−1527/34)
Raphael
(1483−1520)

Parnassus

c. 1517−20
Engraving, 353 × 468 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 25102
Read More

 

Although the Mantuan engraver, Giorgio Ghisi transformed the fresco with an arched top into a rectangular format, he was certainly aware of the finished wall painting. This is proven by the inclusion of the seated figure in the foreground, usually identified as Michelangelo, that Raphael added subsequently to the fresco. The inscription describing the scene as Saint Paul preaching in Athens derives possibly from the publisher, and perhaps encouraged the selling of the print of a complex theological content.

cat007 (Parmigianino 6291)


Parmigianino
(1503−1540)

Sleeping Cupid

c. 1524−30
Etching and engraving
65 × 100 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 6291

 

Read More

 

Parmigianino not only cooperated with the most eminent printmakers of the period, but was the first Italian painter making etchings himself. The Sleeping Cupid is a free interpretation of the slain child in the foreground of The Massacre of the Innocents by Marcantonio Raimondi and Raphael. It was one of Parmigianino’s first etchings in which he experimented with the possibilities of the technique.

cat006 (Raimondi H.6871)


Marcantonio Raimondi
(1470/82−1527/34)
Raphael
(1483−1520)

The Massacre of the Innocents (without fir tree)

c. 1511−12
Engraving, 277 × 425 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest H.6871
Read More

 

The production of the new version of the engraving may have been encouraged by the success of the composition. As the original plate was in the possession of Raphael, the engraver would not have profited from its reprinting. Thus a few years later Marcantonio pirated his own best-selling work.

cat005 (Raimondi 5536)


Marcantonio Raimondi
(1470/82−1527/34)
Raphael
(1483−1520)

The Massacre of the Innocents (with fir tree)

c. 1511−12
Engraving, 277 × 428 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 5536
Read More

 

The composition belongs to the Florentine tradition of multifigured scenes populated by male nudes, beginning with the Battle of the Nudes by Antonio Pollaiuolo. The  Massacre of the Innocents was the most celebrated and widely reproduced engraving of the period, and established the decade-long, fruitful print publishing collaboration of Raphael and the Bolognese engraver Marcantonio Raimondi. Two versions of the print have survived: the first with a small fir tree in the upper right corner, the second without.

cat003 (Pollaiuolo)


Antonio Pollaiuolo
(1432−1498)

Battle of the Nudes

c. 1470−75
Engraving
407 × 590 mm
Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest 25094

 

Read More

 

Primary mediators between Antique and Renaissance art had been the figure studies by Pollaiuolo. The Battle of the Nudes became famous in the period above all for its virtuosity of rendering the motion of the bodies. The engraving, with its figures depicted from different views as in sculpture, served as a pattern sheet in Florentine workshops and enabled artists to study the anatomical structure of human musculature.